What Shots Do Puppies Need? Best Guide 2022

Author:

Published:

Updated:

Are you thinking of getting a new puppy? And What Shots Do Puppies Need?

Contents show

Puppies are so adorable, and they make great companions. But before you bring your new furry friend home, there are some things you need to do to make sure they’re healthy and safe. One of the most important is ensuring they’re up-to-date on their vaccinations.

But what shots do puppies need? Here’s a rundown of some of the most important ones.

Talk to your veterinarian about which vaccinations are suitable for your puppy, and make sure they stay up-to-date on all their shots.

When Should I Get Vaccinated?

When Should I Get Vaccinated?

Puppies receive some immunity to disease from their mother’s milk. But this protection doesn’t last long, and they’re susceptible to infection starting at around 6 to 8 weeks of age.

That’s why starting them on a vaccination schedule is essential as soon as possible. Puppies need vaccinations at specific intervals to build up their immune system.

The first vaccination puppy shots are typically given at six to eight weeks of age. Then they’ll need booster shots every 3 to 4 weeks until they’re around 16 weeks of age. After that, they’ll need annual booster vaccinations.

Some vaccines are given as a single shot, while others are provided in a series of two or more shots.

Vaccinable Conditions of Dogs

Vaccinable Conditions of Dogs

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) splits vaccines into core vaccines and non-core vaccinations. 

The list below provides an overview of the core vaccines and non-core vaccinations available for dogs.

Core vaccines are those that are recommended for all dogs in all circumstances. Non-core vaccinations may be recommended for some dogs in certain situations.

Core Vaccines for Dogs

Puppies need vaccinations at specific intervals to build up their immune system. The first shots are typically given at six to eight weeks.

Then they’ll need additional booster shots every 3 to 4 weeks until they’re around 16 weeks of age. After that, they’ll need booster annual vaccinations.

Some infectious diseases of dogs are so common or potentially severe that vaccination against them is considered essential in all circumstances. These are known as “core vaccines.”

Some of the core shots vaccines for dogs are:

Based on risk, puppies should revive the DHPP vaccine every 2-4 weeks until 16 weeks, then annually with a minimum of three doses.

DHPP: Protects against four diseases — canine distemper adenovirus, hepatitis, canine parainfluenza virus, and parvovirus.

Canine Distemperate Virus (CDV) or Canine Distemper Virus (D – Canine Distemper)

Canine Distemper Adenovirus is a highly contagious virus affecting puppies and older dogs. The virus causes severe respiratory illness and can even be fatal.

Vaccination against Canine Distemper Adenovirus is highly recommended and is one of the shots that all puppies need.

Canine Adenovirus (CAV-1) – Hepatitis

Canine Adenovirus (CAV) – Hepatitis is a virus that can affect the liver and can be deadly to puppies. It is most commonly spread through contact with feces and can also be transmitted through the air.

Puppies should receive two vaccinations at least two weeks apart, starting at eight weeks.

The first puppy vaccination will not provide complete protection, so getting the second one is important.

The dog’s vaccinations booster should be given every year.

CAV-2 Canine Adenovirus-2

CAV-2 is a highly contagious and milder canine adenovirus that can cause severe respiratory illness in puppies, especially those not yet vaccinated. Symptoms include fever, runny nose, and watery eyes.

his virus can also lead to pneumonia, which can be fatal. The good news is that a vaccine is available to protect puppies from this deadly virus.

Canine Parvovirus (CPV)

Dog Parvovirus (CPV) is a highly contagious virus that can affect dogs of all ages but is most often seen in puppies and young dogs. The virus attacks the dog’s gastrointestinal system and can be fatal.

Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. Dogs that survive can suffer from lifelong health problems.

Rabies Vaccine

Rabies is a deadly virus that can be transmitted to both animals and humans. It is usually spread through the bite of an infected animal and can cause severe illness and even death.

The rabies vaccine is preventable through vaccination, so it is essential to ensure your puppy is up-to-date on this rabies vaccine.

A rabies shot is typically given to puppies at 16 weeks, but some veterinarians may recommend an earlier puppy’s age.

Rabies is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system and is fatal. The virus is usually spread through an infected dog bite, such as a bat or raccoon.

The nervous systems of all mammals are affected by rabies. The virus is typically spread through saliva, usually through a bite from infected dogs.

The incubation period (the time from exposure to symptoms) can be as short as ten days or as long as several months.

Symptoms include fever, muscle weakness, paralysis, and seizures. Once symptoms develop, the disease is almost always fatal.

See also  Best 7 Raincoats For French Bulldogs

Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that can affect both animals and humans. It is spread through contact with contaminated water or soil, such as puddles or streams.

The bacteria can enter the body through cuts or mucous membranes, such as the eyes, nose, or mouth.

Leptospirosis can cause various symptoms, including fever, muscle pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, the disease can lead to kidney failure (with or without accompanying liver failure) or meningitis.

Puppies should receive two vaccinations at least two weeks apart, starting at eight weeks. The first vaccination will not provide complete protection, so getting the second one is important.

Non-Core Vaccines for Dogs

Non-core vaccines may be recommended for some dogs in certain situations but are not always necessary. Some of the non-core vaccines for dogs include:

Bordetella Vaccines Bronchiseptica (Commonly Called “Kennel Cough”)

Bordetella Bronchiseptica (Commonly Called “Kennel Cough”) is a highly contagious virus that can affect the puppy’s age but is most often seen in puppies and young dogs.

The virus attacks the dog’s respiratory system and can be fatal. Symptoms include coughing, sneezing, and a runny nose.

Dogs that survive can suffer from lifelong health problems.

Bordetella: Also called kennel cough, this disease is highly contagious and can be transmitted through the air or by contact with contaminated surfaces.

It’s recommended for all dogs, especially those around other dogs frequently, such as at daycare, boarding facilities, or dog parks.

The bordetella dog vaccination we give does not need a booster. However, it may recommend bolstering if you received previous vaccinations from another veterinarian.

Canine Coronavirus (CCV)

Canine Coronavirus (CCV) is a virus that can cause severe respiratory illness and can even be fatal in puppies. It is most commonly spread through contact with feces and can also be transmitted through the air.

Puppies should receive two vaccinations at least two weeks apart, starting at eight weeks. The first vaccine will not provide complete protection, so getting the second one is important. A booster should be given every year.

As your puppy grows into adulthood, they will need booster shots less frequently. Adult dogs typically only need booster shots once a year.

However, some dogs may need more frequent booster shots depending on their lifestyle and health condition.

Canine Influenza Virus (CIV)-(Commonly Called “Dog Flu”)

Canine influenza, or dog flu, is a highly contagious virus affecting dogs of all ages. The virus causes severe respiratory illness and can even be fatal in puppies.

Dog vaccination against canine influenza is highly recommended and is one of the shots that all puppies need.

Parainfluenza

Parainfluenza is a virus that can cause severe respiratory illness and can even be fatal in puppies. It is most commonly spread through contact with feces and can also be transmitted through the air.

Puppies should receive two vaccinations at least two weeks apart, starting at eight weeks. The first vaccine will not provide complete protection, so getting the second one is important. Booster vaccinations should be given every year.

Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease is a bacterial infection that can be transmitted to dogs through the bite of an infected tick. The bacteria can cause severe illness and even death if not treated.

Puppies should receive a dog vaccination against Lyme Disease at eight weeks, and booster shots should be given yearly.

Start Your Puppy’s Immune System Off Right with These Shots

Start Your Puppy's Immune System Off Right with These Shots

When bringing home a new puppy, one of the most important things to do is start their immune system. You can take them to the vet for their first check-up and shots.

For example, they will need a distemper adenovirus vaccine, given in a series of two shots three to four weeks apart.

They will also need a rabies vaccine if they are over three months old. If your puppy has not been vaccinated, they risk getting very sick from diseases easily prevented.

Starting your puppy’s immune system is essential to being a responsible dog owner. It will help them stay healthy to enjoy a long and happy life with you.

Puppy Shot Don’t Last Forever!

Puppy Shot Don't Last Forever!

Though we love our furry friends dearly, sometimes taking care of them can be a pain – especially regarding vaccinations.

Though many assume shots last forever, this isn’t the case.

To keep your pup healthy and happy, you’ll need to take them for booster shots every few years.

Though it may seem like a hassle, booster shots are crucial for protecting your dog from deadly diseases.

So next time you feel reluctant about making a vet appointment, just remember that it’s for your dog’s health!

Regarding your pet’s health, it’s essential to stay up to date on their vaccinations.

Why Are Puppy Shots a Series? Why Is Timing Important?

Why Are Puppy Shots a Series? Why Is Timing Important?

Puppy shots are a series because they must be given in two doses, three to four weeks apart. Timing is essential because the first vaccine will not provide complete protection, so getting the second one is important.

The second dose is usually given at 12 weeks. Booster vaccinations should be given every year. As your puppy grows into adulthood, they will need booster shots less frequently.

Adult dogs typically only need booster shots once a year.

However, some dogs may need more frequent booster shots depending on their lifestyle and health condition.

Unvaccinated animals and infected animals can pose a severe threat to public health and safety. They can also spread disease to other animals and humans.

It is essential to get your puppy vaccinated to help protect them from deadly diseases.

Why Do Puppies Need Three Rounds of Booster Vaccinations?

Why Do Puppies Need Three Rounds of Booster Vaccinations?

Puppies are adorable, and there’s no denying it. But they’re also a lot of work. One crucial task for puppy parents is ensuring their furry friend stays up to date on the vaccination process.

Why three rounds of booster shots? Isn’t one enough? It turns out there’s a good reason for the multiple visits to the vet.

Puppies are born with some immunity to disease thanks to maternal antibodies passed along from their mother. However, this immunity doesn’t last long.

By four to six weeks of age, puppies need their first round of vaccinations to help them build up their immunity to disease.

The next round of vaccinations is given at four months, and the final round is at six months. After that, dogs only need booster shots every one to three years, depending on the vaccine.

See also  Best 6 Dog Tooth Brush For Your Bulldog

So why not just give all the shots at once and be done with it? 

Puppy’s immune systems are still developing and not as strong as an adult dog’s. Some adult dogs might receive certain vaccines annually; however other vaccines might only be given every three years.

But for puppies, their immature immune systems aren’t able to handle that much vaccine all at once.

So the vaccines are given over several months to help them build immunity without overwhelming their system.

Giving too many pet vaccines at once can overwhelm a puppy’s system and cause problems.

Additionally, each vaccine needs time to take effect and provide protection.

Spacing out the vaccinations allows puppies to build up immunity gradually and helps reduce the risk of adverse side effects.

What Are the Side Effects of Puppy Shot?

What Are the Side Effects of Puppy Shot?

Most people are familiar with the shots puppies need to stay healthy, but many don’t know there can be some side effects.

For example, puppies may experience a mild fever after their vaccinations. This is usually nothing to worry about and will go away on its own in a day or two.

Some puppies may also be more tired than usual and sleep more.

Again, this is normal and nothing to worry about. However, if your puppy seems listless or uninterested in playing, it’s always best to check with your vet just to be sure.

Finally, some puppies may experience a mild loss of appetite after their shots. Again, this is usually nothing to worry about and should resolve itself within a day or two.

However, if your puppy seems to have lost its appetite for more than a day or two, it’s always best to check with your vet just to be sure.

All in all, the side effects of puppy shots are usually very mild and resolve themselves quickly.

So there’s no need to worry if your puppy seems a little off after its vaccinations. Just keep an eye on them and check with your vet if you have any concerns.

Puppy Vaccination Schedule (or Puppy Shot Schedule)

Most puppies will need a series of vaccinations, starting at about 6-8 weeks of age. The required vaccinations vary by region but typically include parvovirus, distemper, hepatitis, and rabies.

Some vaccines are given as a combination vaccine (e.g., DHPP or DHLPP) that protects against more than one disease.

The combination vaccine, or 5-way vaccine, will include protection against adenovirus, distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, and parvovirus.

The 7-way combination vaccine will also provide coverage against Bordatella or kennel cough.

Your puppy will need boosters of some vaccines every year and others every three years. Puppies must be vaccinated every 2-4 weeks until they are at least 16 weeks old. The rabies vaccination is usually given at 4-6 months old.

Vaccination protocol has changed over the years, and some owners choose not to vaccinate their puppies. This is a personal decision that you should discuss with your veterinarian.

Here is a generally accepted puppy vaccination schedule:

Puppy’s AgeRecommended Vaccinations
6-8 weeks of ageDistemper, measles, canine influenza.
10-12 weeks of ageDHPP (vaccines for distemper, canine hepatitis, canine influenza or parainfluenza, and parvovirus).
14-16 weeks of ageDHPP booster, rabies (optional in some areas).
12-16 months – 1-year-oldDHPP booster, rabies booster (optional in some areas).
Three years oldDHPP booster, rabies booster (optional in some areas).

After that, most dogs will need a DHPP booster every 1 – 2 years and a rabies booster every 1-3 years.

Check with your veterinarian to see what is recommended for your puppy vaccination schedule.

Puppy’s Vaccinations Cost

The cost of vaccinating a puppy varies depending on the vaccine used, the required doses, and whether you purchase the vaccine from a veterinarian or pet store.

The most common vaccines for puppies are the combo vaccines that protect against distemper, canine hepatitis, adenovirus, parvovirus, and parainfluenza.

These combo vaccines typically cost between $20 and $40 per dose. Puppies usually need two to three doses of the vaccine, given four weeks apart.

Puppies also need a rabies vaccination, which is required by law in many states. The rabies dog vaccination costs range from $10 to $20.

In addition to the cost of the vaccines, you should also factor in the cost of the office visit to your veterinarian. Depending on the vet, the office visit fee ranges from $40 to $80.

So, you can expect to spend between $100 and $200 on vaccinations for your puppy. Many dog owners choose to purchase pet health insurance to help offset the cost of unexpected medical expenses, like vaccinations.

Schedule Vaccinations for Adult Dogs: Boosters and Titers

As your puppy grows into an adult dog, it will need fewer vaccinations than when they were a puppy.

Once they reach adulthood, most dogs only need two vaccinations per year: one for rabies and one for distemper/parvo.

Some kennel clubs and working dog organizations require additional vaccinations, so check with your breeder or vet to see if your dog needs anything else.

However, even though the frequency of vaccinations may decrease, it’s important to continue them throughout your dog’s life. That’s because some diseases, like rabies, are deadly and have no cure.

Vaccinations are the best way to protect your dog from these deadly diseases.

In addition to yearly vaccinations, your adult dog may also need booster shots every three years.

These booster shots help to keep your dog’s immunity levels high and protect them from disease.

You should talk to your vet about whether or not your dog needs booster shots and how often they should get them.

Finally, some owners choose to have their dogs undergo titer testing instead of booster shots.

Titer testing is a blood test that measures the levels of maternal antibodies in your dog’s blood.

If the levels are high enough, your dog is protected from disease and doesn’t need a booster shot.

Talk to your vet about whether or not titer testing is suitable for your dog.

Vaccinations are essential in keeping your dog healthy and protected from deadly diseases. Work with your vet to create a dog vaccination schedule that’s right for your dog, and be sure to stick to it!

FAQs

I’m Unsure if My Dog Is Up-To-Date on Shots. What Should I Do?

If you have a dog over 16 weeks old and isn’t fully vaccinated, or if you don’t know your dog’s vaccination history, the best course of action is to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian.

What Shots Do Puppies Need?

Puppies need a series of vaccinations, starting at about 6 to 8 weeks. Puppy vaccinations are typically given every 3 to 4 weeks until the puppy is about 16 weeks old.

What Puppy Vaccinations Usually Include:

Rabies
DAPP (distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus, and parainfluenza)
Bordetella
Lyme disease: Helps to prevent Lyme disease in pets.
Leptospirosis
Coronavirus

Do All Dogs Need Rabies Shots?

Yes. All dogs three months or older must be vaccinated against rabies by law.

How Often Do Dogs Need Rabies Shots?

Dogs need a booster shot one year after the initial vaccine and then every three years after that.

What if I Missed My Puppy Shot Schedule?

If you have missed a few of your puppy’s shots, don’t worry. Go to your vet. And you missed the puppy vaccination schedule, and your vet will get back on track.

Why Is Immunization History Essential for Your Adult Dog?

If you have an adult dog and don’t know its immunization history, the best course of action is to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Adult dog vaccinations are usually given every 1 to 3 years, depending on the disease.

Can I Vaccinate My Dog Myself?

The answer is…maybe. It depends on the vaccine and the state you live in. For example, most states require that dogs receive a Rabies vaccination from a licensed veterinarian. However, some vaccines can be given at home if you know what you’re doing. Of course, it’s always best to avoid caution and consult with your veterinarian before administering any vaccines. They can help you make sure that you’re using the appropriate vaccine and technique, and they can also answer any questions you may have. So, while you may be able to vaccinate your dog in some cases, it’s always best to consult with a professional first.

What Is the 5-In-1 Shot for Puppies?

The 5-in-1 shot is a vaccine that protects against five diseases: distemper, adenovirus, hepatitis, parvovirus, and parainfluenza. This vaccine is typically given to puppies at 6-8 weeks old, then every 3-4 weeks until they are 16 weeks old.

What Is the 7-In-1 Shot for Puppies?

The 7-in-1 shot, also called the distemper shot, is a vaccine that helps protect puppies from seven different diseases:
Canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1)
Canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2)
Dog Parvovirus (CPV)
Canine parainfluenza virus (CPiV)
Canine Distemper Virus (CDV)
Leptospira Bacteria
Rabies virus (RABV)

What Is the 9-In-1 Shot for Puppies?

The 9-in-1 vaccine is a combination vaccine that offers protection against nine different diseases: distemper, hepatitis, leptospirosis, parainfluenza, parvovirus, rabies, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), and coronavirus. The vaccine is typically given to puppies at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age, with a booster shot at one year old.

What Vaccines Does Your Pet Insurance May Cover?

Vaccinations are an essential part of keeping your pet healthy.
Most pet insurance policies cover the cost of routine vaccinations, as well as the cost of booster shots.
Some pet insurance companies also offer coverage for rabies vaccinations and other non-routine vaccinations.
Here are some of the most common vaccines that pet insurance companies cover:
Distemper
Hepatitis
Leptospirosis
Parvovirus
Bordetella (for dogs)
Check with your pet insurance company to see what vaccinations are covered under your policy.
Some pet insurance policies have age limits for coverage, so getting your pet insured early is essential.
Get a free quote today and see how much you could save on pet insurance.

Can I Give My Dog a Parvo Shot?

Yes, you can give your dog a parvo shot. The parvo vaccine is typically given to puppies at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age, with a booster shot at one year old. The parvo vaccine helps protect against parvovirus, a highly contagious virus that can cause severe illness in dogs.

How Do Dogs Get Parvo?

Dogs can get parvo from contact with the stool of infected dogs. The virus can also spread through contact with contaminated surfaces, such as floors, kennels, or shoes.

How Much Does a Parvo Shot Cost?

The cost of a parvo shot varies depending on the vet and the region you live in. However, the average price of a parvo shot is between $20 to $50.

What Are the Side Effects of The Parvo Shot?

The most common side effect of the parvo shot is mild soreness or redness at the injection site. Other possible side effects include fever, lethargy, and loss of appetite. However, these side effects are rare and typically resolve within a few days.

When Can Puppies Go Outside?

Puppies can go outside as early as six weeks of age, but they should not be left unsupervised until they are at least eight weeks of age. Puppies should also be vaccinated before going outside to help protect them from disease. When taking your puppy out, it is essential to supervise them at all times and to avoid taking them to places where they could be exposed to other sick dogs.

Conclusion

There are many different shots that puppies need, and it can be overwhelming to keep track of them all. However, there are some core shots that all puppies need, and it’s essential to ensure they stay up to date.

The most important shots for puppies are the ones that protect against rabies, distemper, and parvovirus.

Liver failure has also been reported as a severe side-effect of some dogs. If your dog experiences these symptoms, seek emergency veterinary care immediately.

Puppies also need Bordetella and Lyme disease vaccinations if they spend time at the dog park or other areas where they could be exposed to these diseases.

Following the recommended dog vaccination schedule is essential to ensure your puppy gets all the necessary shots.

Puppies typically need booster shots and an annual dog vaccination schedule throughout their life.

Many dogs can be vaccinated at home if you know what you’re doing, but it’s always best to consult your veterinarian first.

Your dog may be at risk for this disease if they’re around other dogs, so it’s essential to get them vaccinated.

Talk to your vet if you’re unsure about what shots do puppy needs? They can help you create a custom dog vaccination schedule that’s right for your new puppy.

Thanks for reading! We hope this article about “What shots do puppies need?” was helpful.

Leave a Reply

Latest posts